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Prospective Participant Frequently Asked Questions

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Q: Where can I find information on applying to the waiver?
A: Go to the link for the specific waiver you are interested in applying for.


Q: Who do I contact if I have questions regarding the application process?
A: Please contact a participant support specialist. Click here for contact information.

 

Q: Is there an application on-line?
A: There is not an application on line. This is a complicated process and the Division wants the opportunity to explain the eligibility process either in person or over the phone.


Q: Where can I find information on each waiver the Division administers?
A: Go to the link for the specific waiver you are interested in applying for.


Q: What are the eligibility requirements?
A: An applicant must meet residency requirements, clinical eligibility, and financial eligibility. In general, the case manager you choose will first ask general information to see if you meet the level of care for services, then assist you in the required testing – A psychological or neurological evaluation and a functional assessment called the ICAP. The Division will pay for the required evaluations, there is no cost to the applicant.

The Participant Support Specialist will go over the specific requirements of each waiver when they talk with you.  You can also find the Resource Guide for each waiver under the link for the specific waiver you are interested in.


Q: What are the financial eligibility requirements?
A: As of January, 2009, an applicant may have no more than  a gross monthly income of no more than $2022 and assets of no more than $2000.  If you have specific questions about your income eligibility, you should contact your local Department of Family Services office.
For children applicants, only the child’s assets are reviewed.


Q: How long does it take to become a waiver participant?
A: It depends on how quickly all the information and testing is completed. As a general rule, it takes about 6 months for an Adult or Child DD applicant to complete the required testing. Applications for the Acquired Brain Injury waiver take longer because medical documentation from the time of the brain injury  and a neuropsychological evaluation are required. Once all the required evaluations are completed, you will receive either a denial letter or waiting list letter.


Q: What is a waiting list?
A: As of August 2010, there is a waiting list for services on all 3 waivers. Because we have more eligible applicants than funding opportunities, individuals who are eligible go onto a waiting list. When funding becomes available, the Division takes people off the waiting list using 2 criteria: the length of time the person has been waiting and the level of severity of the person’s  disability.

As of August 2010,  individuals have been waiting on the Adult DD and Child DD waivers for over 2 years and individuals waiting for services on the Acquired Brain Injury waiver have been waiting for about one year. There is currently no new funding to fund those individuals on the waiting lists.  The Division continues to fund emergencies and those children who are currently receiving services on the Child waiver and are moving over to the Adult waiver.

While you are on the waiting list you are not considered a waiver participant.  You will be considered a waiver participant once funding becomes available for you and the Division has approved your plan of care.